Brookhaven Town

Bring dad to CEED on Sunday for stories and nature

Plenty of activities scheduled from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Linda Leuzzi
Posted 6/17/21

Coax dad off his Netflix couch on Father’s Day.

Or just come yourself.

Because the stories and activities waiting to unfold June 20 at CEED’s Summer Solstice and Nature Festival …

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Brookhaven Town

Bring dad to CEED on Sunday for stories and nature

Plenty of activities scheduled from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Posted

Coax dad off his Netflix couch on Father’s Day.

Or just come yourself.

Because the stories and activities waiting to unfold June 20 at CEED’s Summer Solstice and Nature Festival will rival any award-winning script or barbecue. And it’s all free.

Starting at 11 a.m., Uaian Arawak Taino, a Native American elder, will relate indigenous stories. Then, Shinnecocks John and Cholena Smith will follow, wearing regalia, performing traditional singing and dancing. After that, internationally celebrated pan flute musician Sicanni Tallan Purizaca will play his haunting instrument for the remainder of this hour-long collaborative program.

“Each will perform for 20 minutes throughout the day in that order,” said Eric Powers, CEED’s program and site director and lead environmental educator.

There’s plenty of time. The event ends at 3 p.m.

The CEEDling Grove structure stood in back of Powers as he sat at a picnic table, while two of the nature center’s chickens moseyed over.

“We’ll have children’s stations there with arts and crafts,” he said, pointing to the grove. “And you can get your picture taken in the three face cutouts: the fox, cardinal and rabbit.”

Learn about bees at the Let It Bee area, stacked logs with drilled holes. “A lot of native bees need dead wood,” Powers explained. “We drilled holes in the logs so they can nest there. We even have cuckoo bees.”

After watching the performances and children getting creative with crafts, wander over to the dozen or so vendors selling items including native plants and beautiful wampum jewelry. Powers was excited about the native plant vendor, especially. “They support our native bugs and there is so much of our wildlife that eats them,” he said.

A meditative walk will be offered at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m.; Powers will keep a camp fire going.

“It represents home and brings people together,” he said.

Thirty volunteers, along with Powers, will gladly guide you to parking spots, the special programs, and will be happy to discuss CEED’s mission and programs. A special basket raffle as well as a 50/50 raffle is being offered.

Woo-hoo! (If you miss this family-friendly, Father’s Day event, it’s boo-hoo to you!)

Powers said he’s always looking for diversity, so get your taste buds ready for the Latin food truck with its specialties.

“We’re celebrating the summer solstice, the longest day of the year,” Powers said. “So we’ve chosen to honor our native plants, animals and indigenous people, as well as our diverse population.” For more information or to contribute to CEED’s fabulous programs, visit ceedli.org.

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